Estimating mineral changes in enamel formation by ashing/BSE and microCT

J. E. Schmitz, J. D. Teepe, Y. Hu, C. E. Smith, R. J. Fajardo, Y. H P Chun

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

  • 7 Citations

Abstract

Enamel formation produces the most highly mineralized tissue in the human body. The growth of enamel crystallites is assisted by enamel proteins and proteinases. As enamel formation progresses from secretory to maturation stages, the composition of the matrix with its mineral and non-mineral components dynamically changes in an inverse fashion. We hypothesized that appropriately calibrated micro-computed tomography (μCT) technology is suitable to estimate the mineral content (weight and/or density) and volume comparable in accuracy with that for directly weighed and sectioned enamel. Different sets of mouse mandibular incisors of C57BL/6 mice were used for dissections and μCT reconstructions. Calibration phantoms corresponding to the range of enamel mineral densities were used. Secretory-stage enamel contained little mineral and was consequently too poor in contrast for enamel volumes to be accurately estimated by μCT. Maturation-stage enamel, however, showed remarkable correspondence for total mineral content per volume where comparisons were possible between and among the different analytical techniques used. The main advantages of the μCT approach are that it is non-destructive, time-efficient, and can monitor changes in mineral content of the most mature enamel, which is too physically hard to dissect away from the tooth.

Original languageEnglish (US)
Pages (from-to)256-262
Number of pages7
JournalJournal of Dental Research
Volume93
Issue number3
DOIs
StatePublished - Mar 2014

Fingerprint

X-Ray Microtomography
Dental Enamel
Minerals
Incisor
Inbred C57BL Mouse
Human Body
Calibration
Dissection
Tooth
Peptide Hydrolases
Tomography
Technology
Proteins

Keywords

  • dental enamel
  • enamel biomineralization/formation
  • hydroxyapatite
  • micro-computed tomography
  • mineralized tissue/development
  • minerals
  • tooth

ASJC Scopus subject areas

  • Dentistry(all)

Cite this

Estimating mineral changes in enamel formation by ashing/BSE and microCT. / Schmitz, J. E.; Teepe, J. D.; Hu, Y.; Smith, C. E.; Fajardo, R. J.; Chun, Y. H P.

In: Journal of Dental Research, Vol. 93, No. 3, 03.2014, p. 256-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

Schmitz, J. E.; Teepe, J. D.; Hu, Y.; Smith, C. E.; Fajardo, R. J.; Chun, Y. H P / Estimating mineral changes in enamel formation by ashing/BSE and microCT.

In: Journal of Dental Research, Vol. 93, No. 3, 03.2014, p. 256-262.

Research output: Contribution to journalArticle

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